The Search for Meaning

26 Jun

Blue FlameEver since I started Dreaming Life, I was hesitant to share it with my family and friends.

Why?

Well…

It’s not like I’m writing about the latest mp3 players or posting gag videos.

I’m writing about Salvia Divinorum, DMT, DXM, Ayahausca, and Calea Z. I’m interviewing people on entheogens and asking people about their shamanic experiences in the jungles of Peru. I’m writing about going to sleep and waking up in your dreams. I’m asking people about the 10th Dimension and giving out tips on how to fly in your dreams.

This is not the stuff of dinner conversation!

And these subjects are rarely discussed with my friends and family because frankly, they’re not interested in it like I am.

But I do hope that the “drug theme” to this website isn’t seen as juvenile indulgence.

Ever since I was in middle school, I can remember being fascinated with drugs. I read all the cheesy propaganda books on LSD and marijuana available at the schools library.

Later, as a teenager, despite actually being big into straight edge, I was openly fascinated with hallucinogens and dissociatives and what their effects meant, what it taught us about the brain and our minds, how we process and understand reality, and maybe, just maybe, what these experience could teach us about things beyond our everyday experiences – the stuff along the lines of ego dissolution and feeling one with everything.

It is in this sense that I am intensely interested in drugs. It’s not about a buzz or getting “fucked up.” Far from it. Truth me told, I loathe that kind of attitude towards drugs.

To paraphrase Dan Carpenter:

despite my appearances to some, this pursuit is an inherently spiritual pursuit.

This doesn’t necessarily mean God or religion, although it could include those things.

What I mean is that my interest in drugs, dreaming, and the mind is a spiritual pursuit in that it’s ultimately about the search for meaning.

And that sums up the entire premise of this blog, actually.

8 Responses to “The Search for Meaning”

  1. Jacob Haqq-Misra June 26, 2007 at 5:54 pm #

    Well said! You stated a very healthy outlook to the world of drugs, one that many people do not share.

    It seems to me that some of the typical views of
    drug use stems from the way we use prescription and over-the-counter medicinal drugs. We use these medicines to make ourselves feel better, to remedy some illness or unpleasant feeling. Following this reasoning, the use of any other type of drug (legal, illegal, herbal, or manufactured) is assumed to be for similar reasons–certainly not as devices to explore spirituality or meaning. You phrase it very well, though, and I think you are quite right about how we can learn things about our own minds.

  2. Ben June 26, 2007 at 6:17 pm #

    Within reason, I think its normal to use substances for pleasure or to make us feel better, and I don’t think there’s anything wrong with it. Concerning so-called harder drugs though, if there use isn’t blanketed with respect and awe at their potential; then, from my perspective, using them is a waste of time, and unfortunately, reinforces the viewpoint that psycho-active substances can’t be of any personal, intellectual, or spiritual value.

  3. Sophia July 5, 2007 at 5:36 pm #

    You’re doing the right thing, not to worry! It is unfortunate that the rest of the world cannot see the wisdom that some of these medicinal herbs offer, nor can they see how for some they are tools to help bring us closer to the divine.

    Society really knows how to ruin things, and place a veil over everyone’s eyes! It’s about responsible use! If people can be responsible in their use, they should be allowed to do what they want with it.

  4. Shannon July 18, 2007 at 2:15 am #

    I couldn’t agree more! Most people lump together people who use drugs to avoid pain and those who use drugs to explore- yet they could not be more different.

  5. Chris August 2, 2007 at 7:45 pm #

    “But I do hope that the “drug theme” to this website isn’t seen as juvenile indulgence.”

    My wife has that view – everytime she encounters an adult our age who smokes pot, she wonders when they are going to grow up. Sadly, she’s starting to feel that way about me even though in her presence I’ve only mentioned how I remember feeling good in my pot-smoking days some 20-odd years ago.

    Really enjoy your web site!

  6. Ben August 2, 2007 at 10:59 pm #

    Chris,
    I am married too, and drug-use is somewhat of a touchy subject between my wife and I, although for different reasons. It’s not to much that my wife is against drugs, but hearing me talk about them (or actually using them) causes her to worry about my safety.
    I really appreciate you coming on board today and sharing some comments. I’m always hyped to see new people on the site! 🙂 I skimmed your blog earlier today, secretly from my workstation at work, and was definitely intrigued by what I saw… hope to see you around more.

  7. Liara Covert October 29, 2007 at 6:48 am #

    Why shouldn’t you feel comfortable bringing unsual or esoteric topics up during typical dinner conversation? Part of the reason why people fear topics is because of ignorance. If you already know people are uneasy about certain subjects, that’s another story. Yet, by giving into yoru own fears of what people maythink, you’re actually giving your own fear power over your mind and your choices.

  8. Liara Covert October 29, 2007 at 6:48 am #

    Why shouldn’t you feel comfortable bringing unsual or esoteric topics up during typical dinner conversation? Part of the reason why people fear topics is because of ignorance. If you already know people are uneasy about certain subjects, that’s another story. Yet, by giving into yoru own fears of what people may think, you may actually giving your own fear power over your mind and your choices.

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